48h Open House Barcelona

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Parabolic arches inside Colegio Teresiano

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details inside Casa del Baro de Quadras by Puig i Cadafalch

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For the past five years, 48hour Open House Barcelona has organized a weekend long architecture festival in the fall. For just two days in October over 150 buildings that are normally closed to the public participate in this event of portes obertes (open doors) and grant free entry to visitors. These buildings include the 125 year old school designed by Gaudí himself, an old Estrella Damm factory, water towers, buildings by Gaudí’s contemporaries such as Puig i Cadafalch and Domènech i Montaner, modern and luxury apartment buildings and hotels, architect’s offices, the terraces of the Gothic churches, and more. Last year I was oblivious to the fact that this event even existed so you can imagine my glee when I realized I could actually visit – for free – some of the most famous buildings in all Barcelona, let alone Spain.

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Colegio Teresianos

I planned my two days very carefully with a chart that included highlighted “must-sees”, checkmarks next to buildings I was interested in seeing, crossed-out sections of neighborhoods that were too far away to possibly get to, and little hearts next to buildings I had already visited. Needless to say, nearly the entire 3-page list of buildings (a list organized by neighborhood that is provided by the organizers) was highlighted in bright yellow. I started cross-checking the locations and opening times of each building (because every building has a different schedule, and unlike the name LED ME TO BELIEVE, they are not open the entire weekend) and made a very good itinerary.

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Details from the inside courtyard and facade of Palau Macaya, also by Puig i Cadafalch

With lists in hand, blank notebook, camera, and map in hand I set out on my weekend long tour of architecture that included – after all that planning – a grand total of four buildings. Yes, four. Just four. It turns out half of Catalunya was just as excited about the even as I was and most buildings has lines winding down the streets, turning corners, etc.

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Photos from Monasterio de Pedralbes; also part of 48 hour Open House Barcelona

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The important thing to take away from this is that life never goes according to plan, even when you use post-it notes and colored-coded pens. I did prioritize however and I made it to my #1 must-see for the weekend, the Colegio Teresiano designed by Gaudí.

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Parabolic arches in Colegio Teresiano

Located in the well-to-do neighborhood of Sarrià, this school is still in use today and known as the Col-legi Santa Teresa Granduxer to the students and local community. The outside of stone and brick work was impressive to be sure, but the Christian inscriptions which in English translate to “Jesus Christ Our Savior”, and four-sided crosses that adorned the rooftop are what gave this building away as one of Gaudí’s projects.

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Me inside Colegio Teresiano, and the front entry

If the outside is inspiring, then the inside is absolutely mind-blowing. We had to walk in silence through the halls (just like naughty students!) because the sisters who live and teach in the Teresian school still live in the building, just as they did in 1890 (presumably not the same sisters as back then). Spiraling brick columns and high windows and skylights, as well as the dozens of parabolic arches found in the upper story, give the massive building an overall sensation of lightness. The columns in the attic start to hint at a tree-like structure, a feeling of being in the woods, which is also on of the features that make the interior of the Sagrada Familia so breath-taking.

My boyfriend (who braved the 2 hour wait with me) and I both walked away from our short (Spanish) tour of this building in awe of the genius of the eccentric and unpopular (in his time) architect. I can not wait to see what next years list holds.

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A trick of the light; Elevation of Colegio de les Teresianas (name in Catalan)

Stay tuned for more gluten-free travels and even more of my favorite buildings in Barcelona…!

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